Estelle Harris, star of Seinfeld and the Toy Story films, has died at the age of 93

Estelle Harris From Seinfeld And Toy Story Movies Dead At 93




Estelle Harris, who played George Costanza’s mother in the Seinfeld series in the 1990s, has died. She was 93 years old when she died.

The actress died of natural causes on Saturday, April 2 in Palm Desert, Calif., according to Deadline, with her son, Glen Harris, holding her as she passed away.

He informed the outlet, “It is with the deepest regret and grief that I must inform you that Estelle Harris passed away last evening at 6:25pm.”

“Her compassion, passion, sensitivity, humor, empathy, and love were nearly unequaled, and all who knew her will be greatly missed.”

On Twitter, Jason Alexander, who portrayed her son on Seinfeld, paid tribute to Harris, writing, “My TV mama, Estelle Harris, has died, and she was one of my favorite people.” It was a thrill to be able to play with her and enjoy her wonderful laugh. Estelle, I adore you. Best wishes to you and your family. Now and always, serenity. # R.I.P. Harris

Harris, who was born Estelle Nussbaum in New York, began her acting career in the late 1970s and went on to star in shows like Night Court and Married…

With Children before landing a part in Seinfeld. She starred in 27 episodes of the ’90s sitcom Seinfeld, where she fought with George and her husband, Jerry Stiller, who died in 2020 at the age of 92.

Harris also appeared in guest roles on shows including Star Trek: Voyager and Moesha in the 1990s. She appeared in animated shows such as The Wild Thornberrys and Disney’s Hercules before starring as Mrs. Potato Head in Toy Story 2 with the late Don Rickles’ character, Mr. Potato Head.

In the Disney-Pixar franchise’s next two films, she reprised her role. Her final performance was in Toy Story 4, which was released in 2019.

In a statement sent to CNN through his agent, Glen, one of the actress’ three children, said his mother’s passing left “a void in my heart too deep to define.”

Harris has two other children, three grandchildren, and a great-grandson who survive. According to the statement, “She loved meeting and greeting kids of all ages wherever she went—and, of course, making them laugh.” “Her job was her passion, and her passion was her work.”